mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
I’m not Steve Bannon, I’m not trying to suck my own cock. I’m not trying to build my own brand off the fucking strength of the president. I’m here to serve the country. – Anthony Scaramucci, White House Communications Director

I broke down when I read this.

I cried and cried and cried.

I hate Southern Italian men.

I hate every single fucking thing about them.

That’s because I’m a Southern Italian woman. Thank Gawd, I got away.

But come to think of it, aren’t all men disgusting? All women, too? All human beings?

What’s the point of being alive?

###

After about three hours or so, my sense of humor returned. Isn’t it great that all those years of secret yoga practice are finally paying off for Bannon? I thought. Though, really, someone should tell him that some tasks – blowjobs, for example – are best left outsourced.

The point of being alive is obviously to feed cats, to watch The Real Housewives of New York, to eat ice cream, and to see wonderful things like these in antique stores:

unnamed





unnamed-2


Before I had my mini-psychotic episode, I’d spent a pleasant enough day futzing around with various writing projects. The Eleanor Roosevelt Haunted Childhood story has a structural problem: I invented a coachman as the receptacle for the ee-ee-veeel spirit of Elliott Roosevelt, but there’s also an unpleasant male relation lounging around Oak Terrace, Valentine Hall.

Two sinister male presences seems like too many. Plus – Chekhov’s Gun.

The coachman works better for my purposes since I can kill him off at the end of the story. But Valentine Hall is an actual historical element; he lived at Oak Terrace during the same period Eleanor Roosevelt lived there and he was so fucking weird – an 1899 U.S. tennis champion, a mad alcoholic with the habit of shooting at passers-by from the window of his bedroom. It would make a lot of sense (and cut the story by at least 2,000 words) if Valentine Hall becomes Elliott’s ee-ee-veeel introject. Except historically, Valentine Hall doesn’t die until 1937.

Decisions, decisions!

I will futz some more today.

And make money. That asshole apparently is never going to pay me, so I find myself short with all the bills attendant on the first of the month looming ahead. I’ll be able to pay them all, but it’s seven days of ramen dinners for me.

Hello people!

Jul. 28th, 2017 10:12 am
mybeautifulwars: (so mystical)
[personal profile] mybeautifulwars posting in [community profile] addme

AGE GROUP / GENDER: Early 40s & F

COUNTRY: USA

LIKES: Creating. Daydreaming. Paddle boarding. Vegetables. Goats. Horses. Chickens. Music.

DISLIKES: Politics. Religion. Hate.

MY STORY: I'm an artist. A creator. A starry-eyed optimistic. I'm an introvert, a smart ass, and I say fuck a lot. (Don't worry, it offends me too) I live on a very old farm with my husband. I have muddy boots, painted fingernails, my own business, and a large collection of bungee cords. My writing style fluctuates greatly with my moods. I reserve the right to not make any sense at any given time as well as the right to make you think that six totally different people are writing in this journal. I even entertain myself in that aspect. Just go with it.

Sometimes I write well thought out entries. Sometimes I just type shit and hit post. It is what it is. LiveJournaler since 2003, imported here 2017.

I'M INSPIRED BY: Color. Nature. Compassion.

LIFE GOALS: Avoid growing up. Stop running with scissors. Get taxes done early. Don't go grocery shopping when hungry.

RANDOM FACTS ABOUT ME: I can say the alphabet faster backwards than I can forwards. I can't whistle. I love bananas.

Hey, hi, hello, howdy!

Jul. 28th, 2017 09:51 am
mybeautifulwars: (Default)
[personal profile] mybeautifulwars posting in [community profile] friendfinder
AGE GROUP / GENDER: Early 40s & F

COUNTRY: USA

LIKES: Creating. Daydreaming. Paddle boarding. Vegetables. Goats. Horses. Chickens. Music.

DISLIKES: Politics. Religion. Hate. 

MY STORY: I'm an artist. A creator. A starry-eyed optimistic. I'm an introvert, a smart ass, and I say fuck a lot. (Don't worry, it offends me too) I live on a very old farm with my husband. I have muddy boots, painted fingernails, my own business, and a large collection of bungee cords. My writing style fluctuates greatly with my moods. I reserve the right to not make any sense at any given time as well as the right to make you think that six totally different people are writing in this journal. I even entertain myself in that aspect. Just go with it.

Sometimes I write well thought out entries. Sometimes I just type shit and hit post. It is what it is. LiveJournaler since 2003, imported here 2017.

I'M INSPIRED BY: Color. Nature. Compassion. 

LIFE GOALS: Avoid growing up. Stop running with scissors. Get taxes done early. Don't go grocery shopping when hungry.

RANDOM FACTS ABOUT ME: I can say the alphabet faster backwards than I can forwards. I can't whistle. I love bananas.

Hey... pssst.... yeah you!

Jul. 28th, 2017 09:47 am
mybeautifulwars: (pink bunny)
[personal profile] mybeautifulwars posting in [community profile] friendfinder
Let's get this community rolling again! If you're up for helping to build this group, please share Friend Finder with your friends so they can join us.

 
LINK:  FRIEND FINDER  (https://friendfinder.dreamwidth.org/)

The most bourgeois hotel room in Kiev

Jul. 28th, 2017 02:47 pm
sabotabby: (lolmarx)
[personal profile] sabotabby
We're heading out for lunch as soon as the dude can get the AC working, but in the meantime behold the "VIP suite," in which we will spend our last evening in Kiev. We are pretty sure Soviet dignitaries stayed here and they haven't touched the room since:

enjoy

Kaunas

Jul. 27th, 2017 09:15 pm
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (Default)
[personal profile] sabotabby
I meant for this to be two separate posts: one for the fun stuff, one for the Ninth Fort, which is the most harrowing, emotionally devastating place I have visited since Buchenwald. But of course image hosting isn't cooperating, so unfortunately at the moment, if you want to see the fun pictures, you will also have to see the depressing pictures (which I promise aren't actually that bad, as I only really took exterior shots that are only disturbing if you know the context). This said, here is the gallery, and content/trigger warning for some of the photos being of a place where 30,000-50,000 people were murdered.

(Of course, I have no idea if you can even view the photos. I really need to work out my image hosting issues. Flickr is an impossibility at the moment while I'm out of Canada.)

Anyway! I'm sure somewhere in your mind, you were wondering about the fact that I keep posting pictures of pretty buildings and lovely, walkable cities. Admit it--you expected a bit more Soviet brutalist and you were wondering where it was. The answer is that it's all in Kaunas. Kaunas does have a cute Old Town but the stuff we wanted to see wasn't there, and where we're staying is pure 1960s poured cement. I will admit a slight fondness for it, though I wouldn't want to live there.

Our first stop was the Devil's Museum, which is exactly what it says on the tin. It's an excellent collection of devils of all sorts. Our one criticism is that the gift shop was missing some obvious opportunities as it practically didn't exist.

Then we went across the street to the museum of M. K. Ciurlionis, a Symbolist artist and composer. Cool, not the most exciting, but some lovely work.

We also rode a funicular, which is kind of like an amusement ride except not very good. But it's one of my favourite words now.

The main event was going about a half-hour outside town to the Ninth Fort. It's an early 20th century fort that became a hard labour camp, then a transfer point for deportations to Siberia during the first Soviet occupation of Lithuania, then basically a killing field under the Nazis. The second time the Soviets occupied the country, they turned it into a vast and ghastly monument to the victims of fascism, which subsequently was expanded to include evidence of their own crimes after Lithuania's independence.

I can't really describe it to you properly. Unless you've been in the remnants of a concentration camp or similar, you won't be able to get what it's like to stand in a place that is well and truly haunted by the unquiet dead. The museum consists of one building that's an overview of the atrocities committed on the premises, but focusing mainly on the Soviet occupation, several vast, giant sculptures and plaques describing the Nazi massacres, and the fort itself, which shows prison cells, interrogation rooms, a recreation of a Kaunas Ghetto house, and informational rooms with the requisite belongings of the victims. It's cold, and damp, and good luck ever not feeling that bone-deep chill again. Also, this is why we don't fucking compromise with fascists, okay?

Anyway we coped really well after, which is to say I had 1/3 of a bottle of wine and I'm just about shaking history from my head. Tomorrow it's back to Kiev, and then home.
mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
unnamed-1


Credit where credit is due:

Donald Trump is such a talented cultural terrorist.

Consider this morning’s tweetage:

After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow...... ....Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military. Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming..... ....victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail. Thank you.

There goes Caitlyn Jenner’s Big Dream of becoming a Marine sergeant!

###

This is a Big Deal because it’s a basic civil rights issue.

Let's say that Pacific Islanders constituted 1% of the U.S. population (I have no idea whether they do or don't; this is just for the sake of argument), and let's say Trump banned all Samoans from joining the armed forces. Today's tweetage would be something comparable in terms of the basic issues involved.

But it’s such a hot button.

I’m convinced the dialogue around transgender bathrooms is what won the election for Trump.

Personally? I think people have a perfect right to do whatever they want to their own bodies and to justify that any way they please. Do I think some people are born into the wrong bodies? No. But that’s because I think constraints like “femininity” and “masculinity” are cultural constructs devised by a patriarchal society that have little or nothing to do with the actual physical experience of being either female or male. If someone wants to claim a gender that has nothing to do with their genes or their genitals, that’s A-Okay with me, though.

Frankly, I don’t care who shares my bathroom. And I don’t understand why the U.S. doesn’t go for the European solution and install unisex public in all new private and public buildings.

I am against expensive public works projects designed to retrofit existing toilets, but that’s only because I think the money would be better spent elsewhere. Like on schools. Or public transportation systems.

Economic resources are limited at the local level.

But transgender bathrooms are a red flag for anyone who’s even just a little bit right of center. So I don’t honestly know how you go about having conversations about transgender bathrooms or about the right of trans individuals to join the military without derailing conversations that have larger implications for the common good.

###

Trump is able to create a reflexive fear and terror in a significant portion of the American population by violating their norms and expectations about the social code. He does this for political gain and profit, to gain credibility with his base.

Hitler was good at that, too.

###

In other news, I met up with BB’s pal Magdala in Kingston yesterday. We walked around Kingston, which is an interesting little city and oh-so-historic: The 17th century graveyard of the Old Dutch Reform Church is filled with the names of local towns and bridges.

Magdala is an interesting woman. She lived in a tiny Moroccan village in the foothills of the Atlas Mountains for three or four years. She married a Moroccan musician, 15 years younger than she is. She fell in love with him because of his voice.

Of course, I was dying to ask, And do you seriously believe that he fell in love with you? Or did he just see you as a meal ticket?

But, I didn’t.

Because, you know, propriety.

Fortunately, the subject came up on its own without my having to bring it up!

The marriage ended, she told me, because she’d had to come back to the States for a couple of months to take care of her dying mother, and when she returned to the tiny village in the foothills of the Atlas Mountains, her husband had become an alcoholic. And violent. Threatening to kill her.

“It seemed like such a change,” she said to me. “But then sometimes I would think: Maybe it’s not a change. Maybe he always felt like that. Maybe he was just using me.

“Well,” I said as diplomatically as I could. “The cultures are certainly very different. And I don’t know how many questions would be asked about an American woman who disappeared in Morocco.”

I remembered thinking that exact thing about Imaan: For about a year there, I really was the closest thing she had to a mother. And yet, there really wasn’t any closeness. I was dispensable. I was not part of her tribe, so in some essential sense, I didn’t matter.

(It’s funny. I never felt that way about Summer – who comes from a culture that’s even more unlike mine. I’m tempted to pontificate about the essential differences between Middle Eastern and Chinese cultures here. But I’ll spare you.)

We started talking about North Africa in general.

“I’ve been to Morocco, Egypt, and Tunisia,” I said. “Libya sounded interesting, but it always scared me.”

“Libya used to be a great place under Gaddafi,” Magdala said. “I sure wouldn’t go near it now.”

“Under Gaddafi?” I asked.

“Sure! Oh, come on. You can’t believe anything the American propaganda machine churns out. The Libyans adored Gaddafi. Everyone in North Africa adored Gaddafi. He wanted to create a United States of Africa. That’s probably why the U.S. put a target on his back.”

“Make Africa great again!” I said. “A populist!”

“Absolutely, a populist,” Magdala said.

And a consummate narcissist!”

“I suppose,” Magdala allowed.

“Like Donald Trump!” I said.

Magdala was taken aback. “Well, I wouldn’t compare Gaddafi to Donald Trump,” she sniffed.

“Loved by his base? Hated by everyone else? Sounds like Donald and Muammar were separated at birth!”

“I suppose there are similarities,” she said grudgingly.

timgad


In other North African news, Samir – my Algerian student - is really, really smart.

He’s a programmer, right?

A programmer who deals with abstractions that are far more complex than computer programs, which are still based on syntax. He’s an electronics programmer, which is pure machine logic, ones and zeroes that follow no syntax save applied mathematics. It’s a kind of crystalline approach to thought, which is light years beyond anything my brain could approach.

But, of course, he knows computer languages.

I had this thought that since he is a programmer, and I’m trying to teach him to read English very, very quickly, that it might be useful for him to define English as a set of objects and instance variables.

“So,” I said. “You are going to be looking at these sentences for three things: Subject, verb, and object. The subject does the action; the verb is the action; the object is the thing the action is done to, okay?

“Everything else is a modifier. Think of all those modifiers as variables and methods inside invisible parentheses, okay?”

I read a sentence: A tradition as old as the civilization itself, Greek pottery can be studied as a chronicle of ancient Greek society.

“Subject: pottery. Verb: study. ‘Study’ is what they call an intransitive verb, so it doesn’t do something to the so much as affect the object. Object: chronicle.”

I peered at Samir intensely. “Get it?”

He nodded thoughtfully. “But what is ‘chronicles’?”

“Stories. History. Old stories.”

He nodded again.

I read another sentence: It was designed to fulfill a functional rather than decorative purpose, so Greek pottery was fundamentally related to everyday life, not separated from it.

“Subject?” I asked.

“Greek pottery.”

Pottery,” I said. “’Greek’ describes the pottery.”

I could see the lights flickering in his brain.

“Verb?”

“Related,” Samir said.

“Very good,” I said. “Object?”

“Life,” he said.

“Excellent! Furthermore, the Greeks’ pottery is an essential source of historical information because so much of it survives today. Subject?”

“Pottery.”

“Verb?”

“Is.”

“Object?”

“Source.”

“Very good!”

“What is ‘furthermore’?”

“Also. In addition to. TOEFL uses reading comprehension examples from academic writing, so the writers are going to use a lot of words that people never use, but you will have to know them. Although vessels may be broken, even these remnants of pottery contribute to contemporary historians’ understanding of ancient Greek culture. Subject?”

“Remnants.”

“Verb?”

“Contribute.”

“Object?”

“Understanding.”

“Excellent!”

“But what is ‘remnants’?”

“Things that are left over. Things that remain.”

“Ah!” he said.

And then he began to tell me about the lost city of Timgad, a Roman city almost perfectly preserved because it lies in the Sahara desert just south of the foot of the Aures Mountains where Batna, the city he grew up in, lies.

Timgad was his playground when he was growing up. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but since it’s in Algeria, nobody goes there. And since there’s no money for public works administration in Algeria, there are no officials to keep curious teenage boys from exploring.

After that, Samir began to tell me about the lost city of Tkout, which is even more obscure than the lost city of Timgad: It exists on no map whatsoever. It’s the ruin of an Amazighe city that flourished well before the birth of Christ, about 100 kilometers outside of Batna. The hovels of the modern prefecture of Tkout – many of them constructed from the stones of the forbidden city – were the birthplace of the Algerian War for Independence.

Two more places I long to go to.

Two more places I will never go to.

###

Nothing happens for a reason.

Everything happens for a reason.

Returning after long absence

Jul. 26th, 2017 11:42 am
1_mad_squirrel: (Default)
[personal profile] 1_mad_squirrel posting in [community profile] 2017revival
Any Pride and Prejudice or Lost in Austen active communities?
sabotabby: raccoon anarchy symbol (Default)
[personal profile] sabotabby
We rolled into Vilnius, Lithuania just before 10 pm last night after a four-hour long bus ride. It was pouring rain, which is typical for here (apparently the weather is awful in one way or another at least 60% of the time), and late, so we grabbed dinner at a vegetarian bar and crashed out at the hotel. Today, it was supposed to pour--our cab driver assured us that this time, the entire city would be flooded--but our luck held and we were able to do a walking tour of the Old Town and the Republic of Užupis.

Vilnius has a messy, dilapidated charm. I think, perhaps, my lack of bonding with Riga was due to the fact that it's kept in such good repair; letting a city crumble a bit is much more aesthetically pleasing. It's slightly less Westernized--people here speak Russian as much as they do English, though mainly Lithuanian--and just, well, weirder.

photos )

Greetings

Jul. 26th, 2017 01:18 am
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[personal profile] zhelana posting in [community profile] 2017revival
Name: Zhelana
Age: 35
Location: Atlanta
Gender: Female
Languages: English and a little Spanish

Describe yourself in five sentences or less: I'm a writer and a photographer living in a small house with a husband, two dogs and two cats. I collect things like tshirts and stuffed animals. I like audiobooks while I drive, which I do a lot because I'm in the SCA. I have a youtube channel unboxing lootcrates. I have schizoaffective disorder, but the mood symptoms are largely dealt with with meds and it's mostly just psychotic symptoms now.

Top 5 Fandoms:
seaQuest DSV, Firefly, MCU, HP, Star Trek


I mostly post about: Day to day life which currently includes a partial hospitalization program, writing, volunteering at an aquarium and zoo, as well as volunteering reading to a 3rd grade boy at his school. I'm learning to play golf, and learning to play the recorder. You may eventually get youtubes of me playing the recorder. But first I need to learn how to read music. lol. I go swimming fairly often. I'm in the SCA. Occasionally I get off my but and go to Synagogue. I'm a photographer. I also talk about what I'm reading, which at the moment and for the foreseeable future, includes reading the entire Bible one chapter a night and summing it up in a few sentences of "WTF?" once a week on my Wednesday reading meme. I also post music every Monday, and writing every Tuesday, and unboxing videos every Saturday. I'm also in the middle of a 365 day meme, which will not actually take me 365 days because I keep skipping questions for being too stupid to bother with.

I rarely post about: politics (although every once in awhile it comes up), my husband's dysfunctional family,

My last three posts were about: Weekly reading meme, my partial hospitalization program, taking the dog to the vet, and writing, considering starting a 101 in 1001 list.

How often do you post?: Daily

How about commenting?: I read every day, multiple times a day, but I'm not always the best about commenting. I'll comment if I have something to add, but I won't comment just to comment on every single entry (and tend to get annoyed with people who do that),
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[personal profile] fallon_sousa posting in [community profile] addme
Name: Fallon Sousa
Age: 21
Country: USA
Subscription/Access Policy: Whatever goes/whatever you feel comfortable with, but please no under 18's.

 Interests:
The X-Files, cats, coffee, aliens, life.

I like to post about: Mulder and Scully and how they are the OTP, occasional personal stuff. I love my cats and if I can figure out how to add a picture, maybe I will. I drink a lot of coffee and I complain about that.

About Me/Other Info: If you Google my name, you will see I have written erotica not related to fandom, penned a movie script, and graduated from HS (lol) I'm queer in some way, still figuring out the specifics, and I'm a liberal. No trumpsters, sexists/racists/homophobes please. As long as you are a nice person I'll be nice back. :) I'm also mentally and chronically ill, so you might see stuff about that but not too much.

looking for fan friends :)

Jul. 25th, 2017 10:36 pm
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[personal profile] fallon_sousa posting in [community profile] 2017revival
Name: Fallon Sousa
Age: 21
Country: USA
Subscription/Access Policy: Whatever goes/whatever you feel comfortable with, but please no under 18's.

Fannish Interests: The X-Files

I like to post about: Mulder and Scully and how they are the OTP, occasional personal stuff.

About Me/Other Info: If you Google my name, you will see I have written erotica not related to fandom, penned a movie script, and graduated from HS (lol) I'm queer in some way, still figuring out the specifics, and I'm a liberal. No trumpsters, sexists/racists/homophobes please. As long as you are a nice person I'll be nice back. :)

(no subject)

Jul. 25th, 2017 12:01 pm
bitterlawngnome: (Default)
[personal profile] bitterlawngnome
I had a Milda memory just now. We used to use the words "Persian kitten" to describe that moment when you feel like there's something you should be doing but have no idea at all what it is. Something like "at a loose end".

Since the mid 1970s there had been a commercial for toilet paper (https://youtu.be/V-rX6RpDT0U) on TV featuring fluffy white Persian kittens playing with toilet paper (meant to make you think warm, soft, and fluffy - not bitey with claws). One day M just plopped down on the bed and pawed their air and said "I feel like a Persian kitten with no toilet paper".

And we're off again

Jul. 25th, 2017 04:41 pm
sabotabby: (doom doom doom)
[personal profile] sabotabby
Here are a few last glimpses of Riga before we hop a bus to Vilnius. We went to the Museum of the Occupation of Latvia, the Art Nouveau district, and I shot a few more pictures of the hotel.

under here )

Exploring Riga

Jul. 24th, 2017 10:12 pm
sabotabby: (sabokitty)
[personal profile] sabotabby
I don't have a ton of spoons left over tonight for a long post, so have some photos around and about Riga.

After the aesthetic exuberance of Odessa, Riga seems much more restrained, even dour. It's impressively old (founded in 1201, and there were settlements well before that) and lovely, but also more orderly, less lively, less organic. And, of course, much more expensive: welcome back to Western Europe.

This said, it's gorgeous and fun. Everyone speaks English here, which is relaxing. I don't mean this in a chauvinist way; mainly that I don't need to bother Anya to translate everything. Actually, where we're staying in the old town, it doesn't seem like anyone other than people working here are from here; it's pretty heavily touristy.

Which also means that it's incredibly easy to find vegan food. Including an entire vegan restaurant. I was like, "GIVE ME ALL THE PROTEIN."

The most important story I learned today was this: There were two powerful guilds in Riga. One was for skilled craftsmen, and admitted every eligible craftsman who applied to join. The other was for merchants, and only admitted Germans. A wealthy merchant from Riga applied to join and was rejected on the basis of his nationality. Accordingly, he built himself a giant fuck-off house across the street from the guild building and put black cats on the roof with their asses facing the building, as if shitting. The guild immediately sued to have the cats removed, but because lawsuits take time, WWI broke out, and no one gave a shit about cats' asses. The cats were mysteriously removed anyway in the 1920s, and replaced just as mysteriously in the 1950s, this time facing towards the guild, as it is now the home of the Riga Philharmonic, and no one has any quarrel with them.



photodump )

17 Moments of Riga

Jul. 24th, 2017 12:47 pm
sabotabby: (lolmarx)
[personal profile] sabotabby
Just arrived in Riga, Latvia. Thought, hey, this hotel is teh cute!

Anya is like, "This hotel is familiar."

I realize that this is of interest to probably no one else reading this (sadly it would be if I were cross posting to LJ, where there is a teeny community for such things), but I'm staying in the hotel where they shot Seventeen Moments of Spring (as well as parts of the Soviet Sherlock Holmes.) And if you think I'm not geeking out like mad over this, you don't know me at all.

Fortunately, Anya is the person who introduced me to the series so she is also geeking out and is equally pleased that Stirlitz is watching over the beds in our room, judging whether or not we have adequately sacrificed and fought for the cause of anti-fascism:


Here's the view out the window:



(If you have no idea what I'm talking about, here is my screenshot recap of Seventeen Moments after I watched it and decided that everyone needed to see it. Minus the image hosting, unfortunately; I'll need to fix that at some point.)
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